Lumen Christi Institute Summer Seminars for Graduate Students

Now in their ninth year, the Lumen Christi Institute’s Summer Seminars in the Catholic Intellectual Tradition are open to graduate students in the humanities, social sciences, and other relevant areas of study. Room, board, and a travel stipend are included for those whose applications are accepted. Each seminar  includes five days of intensive discussion based on close reading of the assigned texts as well as daily presentations given by the professor and student participants. A deep knowledge of the material is not required to apply. These seminars give participants mastery over the material under discussion, both for teaching and research purposes, and also deepen participants’ understanding and awareness of the Catholic intellectual tradition. For more information and to apply visit, https://www.lumenchristi.org/programs/seminars

June 22-28

“Is God Knowable by Natural Reason? Philosophy, Theology, and Trinitarian Thought in the High Medieval Ages”

Mark Clark, Catholic University of America

Timothy B. Noone, Catholic University of America

Rome

In this seminar, scholar of medieval history Mark Clark and scholar of medieval philosophy Timothy Noone will offer an intensive survey of theological and philosophical debates about the natural knowledge of God in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Participants will read and discuss the writings Peter Abelard, Peter Lombard, Bonaventure, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas as well as modern philosophical engagement with these questions.

 July 9-15

“The Thought of John Henry Newman”

Fr. Ian Ker, University of Oxford

Merton College, Oxford 

Now in its fifth consecutive year, this intensive seminar will examine Newman’s achievements as theologian, philosopher, educator, preacher, and writer. Remarkably, in each of these areas Newman produced works that have come to be recognized as classics: An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, The Grammar of Assent, The Idea of a University, The Parochial and Plain Sermons, and the Apologia Pro Vita Sua. This seminar will approach Newman’s thought through a critical engagement with these texts 

July 29-August 5

“Catholic Social Thought: A Critical Investigation”

Russell Hittinger, University of Tulsa

University of California, Santa Barbara

 Now in its fourth year, this seminar will have students read, analyze, and discern continuities and discontinuities in Catholic Social Thought from the late 19th century to the present. Lectures, seminar reports, and discussion will focus on original sources (encyclicals and other magisterial documents), beginning with Rerum novarum (1892) and concluding with Caritas in veritate (2009) and Evangelii Gaudium (2013). This intensive course is multi-disciplinary, since this tradition of social thought overlaps several disciplines in the contemporary university including political science, political philosophy, law, economics, theology, and history.

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